(@whschmid)

Deployment

Just Run the Wires

Just get me something, anything. The only option I have right now is $60/month for wireless "broadband" via a cell phone carrier and I'm limited to 5 gigabytes / month. That's twice what it should cost for less than half of what I need. And that's not even 3G wireless. Would you pay for that? I haven't yet. So I'm stuck with dial-up because I moved into this house before the Internet was hardly even heard of back ...more »

Voting

0 votes
Active
(@larrybaumgart)

Economic Growth, Job Creation & Private Investment

Community Empowerment

Of the $7.4 billion, being allocated by the U.S. government for broadband access from the Stimulus Fund, Washington State was recently awarded $84 million, http://www.ntia.doc.gov/press/2010/03012010_BTOP_WAannounce.html. The unfortunate aspect of this, and similar allocations, is that they really do nothing at the community level to address local end user communications or assist their local businesses where the ...more »

Voting

2 votes
Active
(@duramax08)

Deployment

Serve america first

serve the un served first then the under served and after that you can worry about other stuff like healthcare and the environment.

Voting

-1 votes
Active
(@bcleland)

Deployment

A Business Case for Unserved Areas - Broadband Enterprise Zones

Broadband rollout is going well in areas where demand and market forces sufficiently incentivize private network companies, and federal actions must not devalue or weaken incentives for private investment. But there obviously remains the problem of areas where, for reasons of geography, population density, or other issues, a business case for deploying broadband is a challenge. At the same time the policy tool box ...more »

Voting

7 votes
Active
(@jaydhilliard)

Accessibility for People with Disabilities

Disney needs faster home service for employees (disabled or not)

I'm disabled and work from home often. The slow internet connectivity in my area doesn't allow me to fully take advantage of PCoIP technology to work from home reasonably. We have 800 employees interested in Gig service at home, some disabled, some not. We've invested a lot in this work-from-home program, but the infrastructure needs to support faster connections with lower latencies for business customers who have people ...more »

Voting

-2 votes
Active
(@bcleland)

Deployment

Create a Business Case for Hard-To-Serve Areas—Broadband Enterpr

Broadband rollout is going well in areas where demand and market forces sufficiently incentivize private network companies, and federal actions must not devalue or weaken incentives for private investment. But there obviously remains the problem of areas where, for reasons of geography, population density, or other issues, a business case for deploying broadband is a challenge. At the same time the policy tool box ...more »

Voting

2 votes
Active
(@jamesewhedbee)

Wireless Broadband

Spectrum for Broadband from Microwave Frequencies, not Broadcast

TO: FCC FROM: James Edwin Whedbee RE: Broadband Plan To the Commission: I am the owner of KZJW-LD. I continue to hear about suggestions by the Commission staff that the FCC intends to allow broadband providers to occupy television broadcast frequencies by removing broadcasters. After the digital TV conversion, citizens are having greater difficulty getting important TV broadcasts (like Tornado/Storm Warnings, ...more »

Voting

4 votes
Active
(@joetrimmer)

Deployment

My humble thought - billing

Pick a product that is available in the market to measure TRUE line speed and require providers to bill at those speeds. (Hughes used to have a product that would tell you the connect speed at xxxx time. Both the provider and customer has access to that data base). ex: (whatever dollar number is determined by some committee) 786 kbps = $20 per month 2,100 kbps = $ 50 per month Whatever sliding scale. This ...more »

Voting

-6 votes
Active
(@jonathangael)

Wireless Broadband

Eliminate Routers Entirely. Fund us at vator.tv/company/ether2.

In 2003, Buddenberg of the US Navy writes a paper entitled “Radio WAN Media Access Protocol” in which he outlined five requirements for a future radio-WAN MAC. These requirements would pertain to any solution, not just a satellite communications one. 1. The primary requirement is to discipline network nodes so they transmit one at a time. The solution space becomes restricted to scheduling and polling algorithms by recognition ...more »

Voting

-5 votes
Active
(@pangasamaneesh)

International Lessons

Restore pro competitive, innovative common sense Net regulations

Before Bush & Cheney were in the White House we had 30 + years of common sense, pro consumer, pro competitive Internet regulations banning mega mergers between big ISPs, forcing them to share their infrastructure with smaller ISPs, offer cheap Internet access to smaller ISPs at wholesale prices so they can then resell broadband Internet access cheaply to their own customers -- The Ma Bell system was broken up to create ...more »

Voting

1 vote
Active
(@jorel43)

Fixed Broadband

What we need is competition!

What we need is competition, in order to foster better service and higher speeds; we need line sharing, especially since the Internet backbone was built with taxpayer dollars. By allowing line sharing new companies can move into town and offer different services at a lower rate. We the tax payers built the backbone of the Internet, and it has been given to corporations – we need to take it back! Right now if I want faster ...more »

Voting

3 votes
Active
(@nathanward)

Benchmarks

Lets regain our ground on Internet speed (we did invented it)

The United States invented the Internet, so lets become number one again for what we created! Americans like to think we are #1 for a lot of things, but Internet is not one of them. We rank (as of Jan 21, 2010) 29th in the world for download speeds and 30th for upload speeds according to real-world results provided by Speedtest.net (Results can be found at http://speedtest.net/global.php with an American IP address). ...more »

Voting

5 votes
Active
(@nathanward)

Broadband Consumer Context

Change deceptive "Mbps" to the industry standard "MBps".

Most people do not know the difference. The former is Megabits per second, the latter is Megabytes per second. 1Mbps is 8 times slower than 1MBps. For quite some time now, the byte has been the standard for measurement in computing. It's quite deceptive to consumers to advertise with a non-standard form of measurement that most people don't even know there is a difference. It gets confusing to me sometimes. If I need ...more »

Voting

-4 votes
Active